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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express what they call as legitimate and serious concern about mr. morsi's decrees that at least for the time being give him sweeping powers without any oversight for the next several months. he says these moves are an effort to move forward the democratic process and to draft a constitution. his opponents describe it as an undemocratic power grab, and now this face-off is taking shape. one of mr. morsi's advisers quitting today, the supreme court judicial council, the body that represents the top judges, held an emergency meeting today w
judicial counsel. of course, the judges locking horns with mr. morsi right after one of his decrees essentially disabled them. so they're talking. we're going to see what the outcome of that meeting is. in the meantime, the leading factions, leading opposition factions continue to protest behind us in tahrir square. these factions that represent women's rights groups, youth groups, minorities, their position so far has been we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he reverses his decrees. we spoke to one of mr. morsi's top advisers earlier today. we asked him if that was a possibility. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president for us. >> is it possible to rescind his decrees? >> we have had a dialogue. >> reporter: are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president and we are accepting it. we may have some reservations. but as a whole, we must take a step to forward, not to backward. >> reporter: as you heard, we pressed them on the why reasonable degree idea of the president
of demonstrators, already the start of violence, and all this comes just one day after mr. morsi was praised, praised effusively by u.s. officials for his role in mediating the israel/gaza fight. back to you in new york. gregg: it just goes to show you how quickly events can turn around in that region of the world. steve heir began, we'll check back with you a bit later on. thanks very much, in cairo. patti ann: and another hotbed in that region, the hamas terror group is now accusing israel of breaking ceasefire rules two days after a truce was reached along the israel/gaza border. israeli officials say they will investigate reports that a palestinian man was killed. israel has arrested several palestinians suspected of blowing up a bus in tel aviv. we'll bring you the latest on that when we have that. gregg: those are just a few of the many stories we are following this morning. a busy day in "america's newsroom." >>> plus, a boat trip turning deadly off the coast of florida. how 23 people ended up in a fight for their lives. patti ann: and tragedy on the highway. a chain reaction crash ca
or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his
, now i'm king. megyn: what role do you think it had, if any, the praise that we gave to mr. morsi in the wake of his role in brokering a truce between hamas and israel last week >> that was strategic idiotcy. hamas was on the ropes, israel was winning on points. morsi stepped in and basically rescued hamas and got the cease-fire. our president, secretary of state, ambassador rice in the u.n. all gushed praise upon morsi and elevated him to the state us of global statesman. it was a terrible mistake because he hadn't earned that, and the next day he thumbed his nose, to put it politely at our government and the west entirely and said, i'm now in charge, i'll do what i want, egypt is going to do what i say, and, by the way, the revolution is over. megyn: does it make it tougher for us to now condemn what he's doing? so far we've had jay carney say we support democracy, we believe the government in egypt should reflect the will of the people, we have concerns about what morsi has done. >> it would be nice if we supported democracy. but i don't think this administration does. let's be
square in central cairo. mr. morsi is make iing a politi gamble that most people here will vote for a constitution that represents his own more conservative views but in doing so he has infuriated many other egyptians. for "cbs this morning," holly williams, cairo. >>> back here in the united states, many people up and down the west coast are keeping a close eye on a triple threat of storms. northern california is getting drenched this morning. and forecasters say even worse weather is yet to come. carter evans is in soggy sacramento. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. right now much of northern california is under a flood warning. this is the second of three major storms to hit the area. and already overnight here in sacramento, we've seen up to 2 1/2" of rainfall. this is the storm northern california has been bracing for. forecasters say this downpour has the potential for widespread damage. >> friday is going to be bad. sunday is going to be even worse. >> reporter: here is why californians are worried. it's not a single storm but a one, two, three punch. increasing th
? >> dialogue. >> reporter: they want dialogue. they want concessions. they want mr. morsi to rescind his decrees. what kind of concessions are you willing to make? . >> the decision is up to the president. not up to us. we are ready for dialogue with our -- >> reporter: are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of those decrees? >> decree is up to the president, accepting it -- we may have some reservations. but as a whole, we must take a step forward, not backward. >> reporter: so two big headlines coming out of egypt today, first off, president morsi not scaling back his decrees, sticking with them and the muslim brotherhood calling off their 1 million-man demonstration scheduled for tomorrow. >> we'll have a lot more on this story coming up later this hour. thanks very much, reza sayah, from cairo. >>> other news we're following, including news from afghanistan as the united states looks to wind down its troop strength in afghanistan, plans are being made for a u.s. military force to stay on there even after the 2014 handover to afghan authorities. our pentagon correspon
of in this is specifically going into -- [inaudible] and one-third of that into gaza. >> mr. martin hallward. >> congratulate morsi of egypt on his moderating role, but also his advice to vote yes to the recognition of pal the tin yang states at the united nations, thereby demonstrating some small progress for those palestinians promoting the path of diplomacy, not violence. >> well, this is the debate that we entered into earlier. now, i've had this discussion with my egyptian counterparts a couple of times already, understandably, and as i say, there's a wholly legitimate point of view about that. my judgment is that it's important to do whatever is necessary to support a return to negotiations and that a vote now in the general assembly does not support that. so that is the government's considered view. we will continue to discuss this with our european partners as to how we should respond to the actual vote. >> jeremy corbin. >> could the foreign secretary have a word with the undersecretary of state who is apparently in ramallah today and in israel yesterday and to suggest that he goes on to visit gaza
, secretary clinton did call the foreign minister of egypt, mr. amr, and tried to get some clarification. they discussed this not only this political issue of president morsi, but the issue of gaza, where he played a very important role, and that is why secretary clinton was in that region, just last week. but the -- there is concern and let's listen to what the spokesperson for the state department, victoria newland, had to say about it. >> it is a very murky uncertain period in terms of the legal and constitutional underpinnings, which makes it all the more important that the process proceed on the basis of democratic dialogue and consultation. >> so if it is murky, they are watching it very, very closely. in fact, one thing that victoria nuland said, the right people are talking to each other. that's good news. they want this to happen, number one, peacefully, and number two, democratically. and, you know, brooke, on another issue that funding the imf, of course, just reached an agreement with egypt on some badly needed funds that they needed, and there is a question also here in the
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)